Operations

ECCFPD Fire Stations | ECCFPD Fire Apparatus

The largest Division within the East Contra Costa Fire Protection District is the Fire Suppression (Operations) Division. It is responsible for emergency medical services (EMS), fire suppression, rescue, hazardous conditions, and all other emergency and non-emergency calls for service.

The Operations Division is responsible for ensuring that the citizens are served through an efficient and effective system of services designed to protect life, environment, and property. Part of this system includes staffing and maintaining three fire stations located in all of the district's major regions.

More than seventy-five percent of the calls for service are responses to medical emergencies. Firefighting related calls equal ten percent of the overall responses. The remaining calls range from hazardous material responses, to rescues, and public assist requests.

The caring professionals who staff East Contra Costa's Fire Stations respond to calls for service on a variety of fire apparatus. The most common piece of equipment is a triple combination engine. This is composed of a water pump, a water tank, and a full complement of hoses. The second most seen is the command vehicles for the department chiefs. Our department also manages three pieces of speciality equipment. Our wildland brush apparatus responds to grass and brush fires within the district limits and beyond. The district also staffs water tenders for water supply in our rural un hydranted areas. Last but not least is our Fire Rescue Boat used for fire suppression and rescue on our many miles of inland water ways.

The Fire Suppression element of the Operations Division is divided into three platoons, A, B, & C Shifts. These Shifts are supervised by Battalion Chief who report directly to the Fre Chief. The Fire District personnel assigned to these shifts consist of Fire Captains, Fire Engineers, and Firefighters. These people are a highly professional, trained force of men and women who respond to approximately 6000+ calls-for-service annually.